Language use 1: Contrasting information

Look at this sentence from Reading 2 (Part B) that defines issued share capital: Issued share capital, as opposed toauthorised share capital, refers to shares actually held by shareholders. When describing a new idea, it can be contrasted with an idea that your listener is already familiar with, using the preposition as opposed to. The prepositions unlikeand in contrast tocan be used in the same way: Issued share capital, unlike authorised share capital, refers to shares actually held by shareholders. Issued share capital, in contrast to authorised share capital, refers to shares actually held by shareholders. Allthree of these prepositions can also Language use 1: Contrasting information appear at the beginning of the sentence if the previously defined term immediately follows them: As opposed to / Unlike / In contrast to authorised share capital, issued share capital refers to shares actually held by shareholders. These prepositions can also be used when defining two new terms at the same time. In such a case, however, it is necessary to insert which in the following way: Issued share capital refers to shares actually held by shareholders, as opposed to / unlike / in contrast to authorised share, which refers to the maximum amount of share capital that a company can issue. Or Language use 1: Contrasting information: As opposed to / Unlike / In contrast to authorised share capital, whichrefers to the maximum amount of share capital that a company can issue, issued share capital refers to shares actually held by shareholders.

5. Read the information in the table below about the two basic classes of shares: ordinary shares and preference shares. Using the prepositions explained above, make sentences contrasting the two share types.

Example:

1. Unlike ordinary shares, preference shares do not usually entitle the shareholder to vote.

In contrast to ordinary shares, which entitle the shareholder to vote, preference shares do not usually give such a. right Language use 1: Contrasting information to the shareholder.

Ordinary shares Preference shares
standard shares with voting rights usually no voting rights
potential to give the highest financial gains; pro-rata right to dividends have a fixed dividend; shareholder has no right to receive an increased dividend based on increased business profits
bear highest risk low risk; rights to their dividend ahead of ordinary shareholders if the business is in trouble
ordinary shareholders are the last to be paid if the company is wound up preference shareholders are repaid the par value of shares ahead of ordinary shareholders if the company is wound up Language use 1: Contrasting information


documentacoicyb.html
documentacoikij.html
documentacoirsr.html
documentacoizcz.html
documentacojgnh.html
Документ Language use 1: Contrasting information